While historic outbreaks of monkeypox have often been limited to populations in Africa, many cases in the United States have been reported this summer. Many don’t know what monkeypox looks like, or what it may do to the human body.

MedShadow Foundation recently released an FAQ about Monkeypox to clarify the misconceptions, release proven statistics, and provide people with up-to-date information on the outbreaks.

Many monkeypox cases in the U.S. have caused painful rashes and lesions filled with pus that cover large portions of the body and often start on the face, hands, and feet. This virus is mainly spread through skin contact between humans.

“All patients in the current US monkeypox outbreak in 2022 have experienced a rash, but the lesions have been scattered or localized to a specific body site,” explained Inger Daimon, MD, PhD, director of CDC’s Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology (DHCPP) in a June 21, 2022 briefing.

Monkeypox was first discovered by Danish scientists in 1958 while studying lab monkeys. There is some debate whether the disease should carry a different name in order to not cause unwarranted harm towards monkeys.

For more on the facts about the illness, visit medshadow.org.

MedShadow Foundation: Founded in 2013, MedShadow is a leader in independent health journalism aimed at making information available on all side effects to medicines, medical conditions, and alternative treatment options to improve the quality of life for all. MedShadow aims, through its unbiased articles, to protect the lives of its readers, allowing them to make informed decisions about the risks, benefits, and alternatives to medicine.

For more information, visit www.medshadow.org.

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For more information about MedShadow Foundation, contact the company here:

MedShadow Foundation
Su Robotti, Founder and President
212-362-1257
su@MedShadow.org
229 E 85th St
Unit K
New York, NY 10028

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